Course Schedule

To: Elders & Wives and
       Evangelists Association Members
 

The LDI administration is preparing the spring 2012 Leadership Development Institute sessions for you, for which you are required to  attend.  This course is one of the phases of the Board of Bishops’ 5-year succession plan. 

The course entitled Ministerial Ethics and Protocolis taught by Presiding Bishop Smith.  You will be blessed and better equipped by the information you will receive!

We have set aside dates for ten sessions.  Please check your calendars asap to for your availability on the following days and times.

Don’t forget to complete your registration form←(Click here to complete form.)

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you all!

Elder Lisa C. Pointer
LDI Registrar
 
1. Saturday  
3/03/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
2. Saturday 
3/10/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
3. Tuesday
3/20/12
7:00pm  
to 
9:00pm
4. Saturday
3/31/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
5. Saturday
4/07/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
6. Tuesday
4/10/12
7:00pm  
to
9:00pm
7. Saturday
4/21/12
9:30am   
to 
11:30am
8. Saturday
4/28/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
9. Saturday 
5/05/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
10. Saturday 
5/19/12
9:30am   
to  
11:30am
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Registration Form

 

(Click on link below to retrieve Registration Form.)

 If Adobe Acrobat Reader does not launch and you are asked for what type of application to open the file with, click →to download a free copy of the latest Adobe Acrobat Reader from the Adobe website

Course Syllabus

 The link below will open the Course Syllabus for Ministerial Ethics and Protocol.  You will need to print this out for your records.

Course Syllabus Ministerial Ethics and Protocol

Spring Session Pre-Reading Assignments

Greetings Board of Elders, Elders’ Wives, and Evangelists Association Membership,
 
Please see below the following definitions and articles that you will need to read prior to the first March 2012 Leadership Development Institute session.  These pre-reading assignments will help you prepare for the Ministerial Ethics and Protocol course.    
 
Please save each definition and article to your desktop or place in an electronic folder on your computer or in your email mailbox.
 
If you have any questions or concerns, you may email me.
 
Sincerely,
Bishop Dr. Pamela A. Smith
Academic director

Happy Reading!

Definition of “Ethics”
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ethic
 
 
Definition of “Ethos” 
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ethos
 
 
Etymology of “Ethic”
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=ethic&allowed_in_frame=0
 
 
 Are Ethics and Morality the Same Thing?
http://tokresource.org/tok_classes/areas/ethics_all_about/the_same_thing/index.htm
 
 
The New Testament Greek Lexicon
http://www.searchgodsword.org/lex/grk/view.cgi?number=2239
 
 
Strong’s Greek/Hebrew Definition
 http://www.bibletools.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/Lexicon.show/ID/G1485/ethos.htm
 
 
What is ETHICS: Holman Bible Dictionary
http://www.studylight.org/dic/hbd/view.cgi?number=T1947
 
 
The Entire Bible, Our Standard Today
  http://www.reformed-theology.org/ice/newslet/be/be.10.78.htm
 
 
Ethics as If God Mattered: Secularism and the Word of God
http://bible.org/seriespage/ethics-if-god-mattered-secularism-and-word-god
 
 
Etymology of “Protocol”
http://www.emilypost.com/out-and-about/official-life/287-official-protocol
 
Synonyms for “Protocol”
http://thesaurus.com/browse/protocol

Critical Thinking is Necessary for Ethical Decision Making

(Click on each link below to view article)

How to Sharpen your Critical Thinking Skills

Sharpening your Critical Thinking Skills

Seven Rules for Sharpening up your Critical Skills

   

Seven Styles of Questioning That Sharpen Critical Skills

Time to Sharpen your Reading and Listening Skills          

By Mohammad Vafaee

The Point of Studying Ethics

The Point of Studying Ethics

Why Study Ethics?

What are Work Ethics?

 
ETHICS /Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Advanced Study of Ethics)
Author: James Fieser
Email: jfieser@utm.edu
University of Tennessee at Martin
 
Meta ethics
Normative ethics
Applied ethics

The field of ethics (or moral philosophy) involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. Philosophers today usually divide ethical theories into three general subject areas: metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics.

Metaethics investigates where our ethical principles come from, and what they mean. Are they merely social inventions? Do they involve more than expressions of our individual emotions? Metaethical answers to these questions focus on the issues of universal truths, the will of God, the role of reason in ethical judgments, and the meaning of ethical terms themselves.

Normative ethics takes on a more practical task, which is to arrive at moral standards that regulate right and wrong conduct. This may involve articulating the good habits that we should acquire, the duties that we should follow, or the consequences of our behavior on others.

Finally, applied ethics involves examining specific controversial issues, such as abortion, infanticide, animal rights, environmental concerns, homosexuality, capital punishment, or nuclear war.

By using the conceptual tools of metaethics and normative ethics, discussions in applied ethics try to resolve these controversial issues.

The lines of distinction between metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics are often blurry. For example, the issue of abortion is an applied ethical topic since it involves a specific type of controversial behavior. But it also depends on more general normative principles, such as the right of self-rule and the right to life, which are litmus tests for determining the morality of that procedure. The issue also rests on metaethical issues such as, “where do rights come from?” and “what kind of beings have rights?”